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The information Cam shared supported the realization of supervisors at Harrah’s Entertainment that one size did not fit all when it comes to recruiting and retaining top employees for the service sector.
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Harrah’s Entertainment

About the client

Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc. is the world’s largest provider of branded casino entertainment; owning or managing casino resorts on four continents, primarily under the Harrah’s, Caesars and Horseshoe brand names. More than 85,000 employees contribute to guest experiences and the company’s success. Harrah’s sets the standard of excellence in the gaming industry with employees who are devoted to delivering truly great service. Harrah’s Entertainment was recently named one of “50 Best Places to Launch a Career” by Business Week magazine.

Business need

With an eye on maintaining the company’s reputation for excellent guest services, Harrah’s Entertainment was preparing to initiate a more proactive recruiting strategy aimed at seeking out optimal candidates for an array of hourly positions. In preparing for this shift, the human resources team recognized that the most highly valued attribute “upbeat and positive” took different forms in different generations. Cam Marston was invited to conduct a workshop with the Harrah’s Entertainment supervisor team to explore generational differences and how they impact recruitment and retention. In addition to general information about each group and the reasons each has developed its collective persona, Cam discussed how the company could make several communication shifts to better meet the expectations of each generation. Using actual Harrah’s Entertainment job descriptions, Cam demonstrated how different information would be valued by different generations.

Insight and impact

The information Cam shared supported the realization of supervisors at Harrah’s Entertainment that one size did not fit all when it comes to recruiting and retaining top employees for the service sector. This in-depth look at the dynamics of each generation both validated the supervisors’ experiences and provided more insight into the reasons these differences exist, while also offering suggestions for how to improve cross-generational communications. Furthermore, the insight directly applies to the organization’s “Get me. Guide me. Root for me.” employee engagement philosophy, helping the team incorporate generational expectations and preferences beginning in the recruiting stage. Overall, the Harrah’s Entertainment leaders report a heightened awareness of how generational bias can impact working relationships and communications.

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